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3 Reasons to Attend the Moonlight Pond Tour


1. Inspiration

We promise, if you attend the Moonlight Pond Tour, you will walk away inspired. Whether you’re dreaming about a pond, already have one and want ideas, or you just enjoy beautiful landscapes, the Moonlight Pond Tour is a must-see.

Gazebo Over the Pond

2. It’s a Family-Friendly Event

We love it when people bring their friends and family, let the kids splash in the water, and roast s’mores around the campfire.

Roasting S’mores around the Campfire

3. Mark The Pond Guy

The Moonlight Pond Tour is a great time to ask Mark The Pond Guy’s questions about your pond project. Bring photos of your yard or project and he can give you ideas and direction.

Mark The Pond Guy Speaking at the Tour

Moonlight Pond Tour Gallery

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Aquatic Plants Inspiration Gallery


© 2012 Heather Harp

Four Before and After Projects


Nothing inspires a water garden lover like great before-and-after pictures! These are some of our favorites, as they show how a water garden can transform your space.

Want to see your water feature on our blog? Just email your photos and story to heather@markthepondguy.com.

Customer Photo Story


Thanks to our customers Rex & Marietta for sharing some photos of their fabulous pond!

“Whether walking, wading, or swimming, I forget about everything else…..my senses are overcome by it’s tranquility.  There’s something hypnotic about it, like staring into a bonfire”. – Rex

“It’s impossible to mention just one favorite thing about our pond…the peaceful sound of the waterfalls, the beauty that blends our garden into nature, the sound of the frogs that have made it home singing in the summer evenings, the multiple varieties of song birds that have decided it’s the best bird bath in the neighborhood or having the fish follow me as I walk the pond edges like puppies waiting for a treat.  I guess I can sum it up by saying that I can’t imagine our yard without it!” – Marietta

If you would like your pond featured on our blog, email, or Facebook, email your favorite photos and a testimonial to heather@markthepondguy.com.

Plants for Your Pond – Iris


I. ensata

Iris

Habit: marginal aquatic perennial

Height: 8″-5′

Spread: 2′ or more

Hardiness: zones 2-8

Few gardens are without at least one iris, but regular gardens often miss out on the iris selections that prefer to grow in water. These classic plants will add a new dimension to your water feature.

Growing

Irises grow best in full sun but tolerate partial shade. The soil should be average to fertile, humus rich and moist to wet, in water up to 4″ deep.

Division is rarely required but can be done between mid-summer and fall when the plants begin to produce fewer flowers or to propagate new plants.

Tips

Popular plants for the margins of a water feature, irises can also be grown in bog gardens and in moist areas around the pond.

Recommended

I. pseudoacorus

I. pseudoacorus (yellow flag iris) grows 3-5′ tall and forms clumps of narrow, upright foliage. It bears bright yellow flowers with brown or purple markings in mid- and late summer. Cultivars with variegated leaves or double flowers are available.

I. siberica (Siberia iris) forms clumps of grassy leaves and grows 2-4′ tall. It normally bears purple flowers in early summer, but cultivars may have pink, blue, white, yellow or red flowers instead.

I. versicolor (blue flag iris) grows 8-32″ tall and spreads 2′, forming clumps

I. siberica

of upright foliage. This native of eastern North America bears flowers in varied shades of purple in early and mid-summer.

Problems & Pests

Usually problem free, irises have rare problems with iris borers, whiteflies, weevils, thrips, slugs, snails, rot, leaf spot and rust.

Excerpt from Water Garden Plants for Washington and Oregon by Mark Harp & Alison Beck, 2008, Lone Pine Publishing International Inc.

Plants for Your Pond – Elephant Ears


Taro

Colocasia

Violet Stemmed Taro

Habit: marginal aquatic or pondside perennial

Height: 20″-6 1/2′

Spread: 20″-6 1/2′

Hardiness: tender perennial often grown as an annual

If your pond is too small to accommodate a mature elephant ears plant, it can be grown on dry land in a large container of consistently moist soil. It will make a striking addition to pondside patios and sitting areas.

Growing

Elephant ears grows best in light to full shade. The soil should be fertile, humus rich, slightly acidic and moist to wet, in water up to 8″ deep.

These plants can easily be brought indoors for winter. Simply place your potted elephant ears in a dish of water in front of a bright window with plenty of space to keep it growing. If you don’t have enough space, you can allow the plant to die back in fall and store its tuberous roots in a cool, dry place until spring. In warm places on the West Coast, it may even survive winter outside. Elephant ears can be divided in early spring.

Tips

Plant elephant ears in your pond or in a moist or boggy area next to the water feature, where its large leaves, which can grow to 36″, create a tropical appearance. If you plan to lift this plant in fall to be brought indoors, plant it in containers.

Recommended

C. esculenta

C. esculenta 

is a tuberous, warm-climate plant that produces large, heart-shaped leaves. It reaches its maximum size

 

over several seasons. Cultivars with dark purple or red-veined leaves are available.

Problems & Pests

Occasional problems with aphids, bacterial blight, rot, spider mites, and whiteflies can occur. However, this plant can withstand heavy insect infestations before showing any symptoms that require treatment.

Excerpt from Water Garden Plants for Washington and Oregon by Mark Harp & Alison Beck, 2008, Lone Pine Publishing International Inc.

 

Fall To-Do List


It’s hard to believe that summer is over and fall is now upon us! This is a beautiful time of the year, as nature begins to prepare itself for the long cold winter months ahead. Sometimes it can be confusing trying to figure out what needs to be done to your pond to get it ready for winter, so we’ve simplified the Fall Maintenance Process to help you out.
  • As leaves fall from nearby trees, you’ll probably have to empty the debris net every day to keep up with the influx of leaves. Another option to prevent a buildup of leaves is to install some Pond Netting, which comes in several different sizes to fit your pond.
  • Have an Aerator on hand for the cold snaps that are sure to come. Aeration is very important during winter months, as aeration helps to keep a small hole open in the surface of the pond to aid in degassing.
  • Switch over to feeding your fish a cold water fish food, such as our Cold Water Fish Food. Their digestive systems are in the process of shutting down, so a food formulated for the colder temperatures will help them to make the transition.
  • Lastly, take some extra measures to ensure your aquatic plants make it through the winter months with a ThermoPlanter, available at The Pond Store.