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Plants for Your Pond – Iris


I. ensata

Iris

Habit: marginal aquatic perennial

Height: 8″-5′

Spread: 2′ or more

Hardiness: zones 2-8

Few gardens are without at least one iris, but regular gardens often miss out on the iris selections that prefer to grow in water. These classic plants will add a new dimension to your water feature.

Growing

Irises grow best in full sun but tolerate partial shade. The soil should be average to fertile, humus rich and moist to wet, in water up to 4″ deep.

Division is rarely required but can be done between mid-summer and fall when the plants begin to produce fewer flowers or to propagate new plants.

Tips

Popular plants for the margins of a water feature, irises can also be grown in bog gardens and in moist areas around the pond.

Recommended

I. pseudoacorus

I. pseudoacorus (yellow flag iris) grows 3-5′ tall and forms clumps of narrow, upright foliage. It bears bright yellow flowers with brown or purple markings in mid- and late summer. Cultivars with variegated leaves or double flowers are available.

I. siberica (Siberia iris) forms clumps of grassy leaves and grows 2-4′ tall. It normally bears purple flowers in early summer, but cultivars may have pink, blue, white, yellow or red flowers instead.

I. versicolor (blue flag iris) grows 8-32″ tall and spreads 2′, forming clumps

I. siberica

of upright foliage. This native of eastern North America bears flowers in varied shades of purple in early and mid-summer.

Problems & Pests

Usually problem free, irises have rare problems with iris borers, whiteflies, weevils, thrips, slugs, snails, rot, leaf spot and rust.

Excerpt from Water Garden Plants for Washington and Oregon by Mark Harp & Alison Beck, 2008, Lone Pine Publishing International Inc.