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3 Reasons to Attend the Moonlight Pond Tour


1. Inspiration

We promise, if you attend the Moonlight Pond Tour, you will walk away inspired. Whether you’re dreaming about a pond, already have one and want ideas, or you just enjoy beautiful landscapes, the Moonlight Pond Tour is a must-see.

Gazebo Over the Pond

2. It’s a Family-Friendly Event

We love it when people bring their friends and family, let the kids splash in the water, and roast s’mores around the campfire.

Roasting S’mores around the Campfire

3. Mark The Pond Guy

The Moonlight Pond Tour is a great time to ask Mark The Pond Guy’s questions about your pond project. Bring photos of your yard or project and he can give you ideas and direction.

Mark The Pond Guy Speaking at the Tour

Moonlight Pond Tour Gallery

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Aquatic Plants Inspiration Gallery


© 2012 Heather Harp

2012 Northwest Flower & Garden Show – By Sue Goetz


We all know that display gardens at flower shows are a bit of theater in the midst of all that horticultural giddiness. Plant nerds almost hate to admit it (it’s all about the plants right?) but we go to the show to be entertained too. Give me an emotional response, not just a stone patio with primroses and red twig dogwood around it. I loved that I could wander to a boulangerie in Paris (Wight’s Garden) or drift off to the sound of a harp playing (Fancy Frond’s). When the Bluegrass band started playing (Susan Browne Landscaping) it made me smile and crave a tall glass of sweet tea and of course the slow rhythmic drip of water on drums from Sublime Garden Design beat to its own unique style of creativity.

Every time I design a garden for the show, I want to incorporate ideas that you can see in your own garden. I strive to be horticulturally accurate (right plants for the conditions we are mimicking),  incorporate garden elements that are usable in the real world (floating water steps, decking that overhangs the water for dipping your feet into) and then I want to give that moment of entertainment. When we heard repeatedly how people would love to sit on the chaise and nap, I knew we had hit the mark.

Re-defining Andante

Over the next few days I will share my steals and inspiration from the garden we designed at the 2012 Northwest Flower and garden show…

O. k… for me it is about the plants:

Variegated Farfugium plays along the water’s edge

Epimedium, Deer Fern and Heuchera ‘Melting Fire’

Create a plant palette. Much like an artist chooses colors that accent, blend, contrast and compliment each other; choose plants that do the same. Start with color. This plant palette played in the shade with burgundy and silver. Dark colored foliage in a shade garden needs contrast; silver and white variegated plants do the trick. The shape and habit of plants is also vital. The spiky foliage of ‘Silver Dragon’ Liriope against the ruffled deep colored foliage of ‘Crimson Curls’ Heuchera, flattered with the dissected fronds of Deer fern (Blechnum spicant) all bring out a tapestry on the ground. You don’t want plants to blur together in boredom; you want to play off the assets of each.

Bergenia ‘Baby Doll’. Liriope ‘Silver Dragon’, Heuchera ‘Green Spice’ tucked with scotch moss along rockery edge

 

The heart-shaped foliage of Epimedium is perfect to weave around the ankles of Sweet box (Sarcococca ruscifolia) and the understory of trees to create an airy evergreen groundcover. Bergenia ‘Baby Doll’ in groupings made you look at this common plant in a whole new way. Plant this like a drifting puddle along the edges of pathways or rockery.


Then there was the darling (and a bit diva-like too) the Farfugium japoncium ‘Argenteum’. This bold foliage was an eye catcher along the edges of the pond, juxtaposed with the linear blades of ‘Elk’s Blue’ rush (Juncus patens). The leaves were bold enough to compete with the massive rock that made up the falls of the water feature. Placing plants next to large rock is not for the faint of foliage. Landscape rockery becomes more natural when plants are tucked around them; just remember to do it like you mean it. Give the rock some competition with bold foliage and color against it.

 

Pinch for tomorrow:
Water features are a lifestyle choice

Used with permission. Please check out Sue Goetz’s blog, The Creative Gardener!

Solution for Small Spaces: Patio Ponds!


As the daughter of Mark The Pond Guy, I’ve been quite lucky growing up surrounded by awe-inspiring landscaping. My dad’s artistic eye for water features made our yard one of the most beautiful I have ever seen. So after I moved out onto my own, you can bet one of the things I miss the most is the gorgeous water features covering much of my parent’s property.

Mark The Pond Guy's Front Yard

I miss going to sleep to the sound of water, feeding the koi, and even fishing in the big “Swim Pond”. So last week I purchased a Patio Pond for my apartment balcony. I chose the 24″ European Terra Cotta Patio Pond, which is small enough to fit comfortably on my balcony, yet large enough for a water lily, some floaters, a marginal plant, and a couple goldfish. I even installed a fountain and LED light to the Patio Pond for sound and aesthetic purposes.

Heather's Patio Pond

Patio Ponds are available through The Pond Store. They’re super easy to set up and require very little maintenance!

– Heather Harp

New Product – Pond and Landscape LED Light Kit


  • Bulb lasts up to three times longer than traditional incandescent lighting
  • Can be used in or out of water
  • Turns on and off automatically
  • Magnified light lens increases light output
  • Consumes only 3 watts of electricity
  • Low-voltage 12 volt
  • Pre-wired for simple installation
Aquascape Pond and Landscape Light Kit includes everything needed to create a beautiful nighttime focal point in any water garden or traditional landscape. The small, compact design allows for installation even in the tightest spots . Kit includes soil spikes for permanent installation around trees and shrubs, and a round base for anchoring under rocks or gravel, making installation quick and easy. The warm natural light output is ideal for lighting waterfalls or for up-lighting water lilies or trees. Don’t be fooled by the small size; you will not be disappointed with the amount of light being produced by these tiny little spotlights!
  • Will not heat pond water
  • Will not overheat when being used out of water
  • Long bulb life
  • Small compact design
  • Contemporary look
  • Photocell included – turns light on at dusk and off at dawn
  • Complete with stand and soil spike

Aquascape’s new Pond and Landscape LED Light Kits are now available on our Online Store and at The Pond Store.

Plants for Your Pond – Iris


I. ensata

Iris

Habit: marginal aquatic perennial

Height: 8″-5′

Spread: 2′ or more

Hardiness: zones 2-8

Few gardens are without at least one iris, but regular gardens often miss out on the iris selections that prefer to grow in water. These classic plants will add a new dimension to your water feature.

Growing

Irises grow best in full sun but tolerate partial shade. The soil should be average to fertile, humus rich and moist to wet, in water up to 4″ deep.

Division is rarely required but can be done between mid-summer and fall when the plants begin to produce fewer flowers or to propagate new plants.

Tips

Popular plants for the margins of a water feature, irises can also be grown in bog gardens and in moist areas around the pond.

Recommended

I. pseudoacorus

I. pseudoacorus (yellow flag iris) grows 3-5′ tall and forms clumps of narrow, upright foliage. It bears bright yellow flowers with brown or purple markings in mid- and late summer. Cultivars with variegated leaves or double flowers are available.

I. siberica (Siberia iris) forms clumps of grassy leaves and grows 2-4′ tall. It normally bears purple flowers in early summer, but cultivars may have pink, blue, white, yellow or red flowers instead.

I. versicolor (blue flag iris) grows 8-32″ tall and spreads 2′, forming clumps

I. siberica

of upright foliage. This native of eastern North America bears flowers in varied shades of purple in early and mid-summer.

Problems & Pests

Usually problem free, irises have rare problems with iris borers, whiteflies, weevils, thrips, slugs, snails, rot, leaf spot and rust.

Excerpt from Water Garden Plants for Washington and Oregon by Mark Harp & Alison Beck, 2008, Lone Pine Publishing International Inc.

Fall To-Do List


It’s hard to believe that summer is over and fall is now upon us! This is a beautiful time of the year, as nature begins to prepare itself for the long cold winter months ahead. Sometimes it can be confusing trying to figure out what needs to be done to your pond to get it ready for winter, so we’ve simplified the Fall Maintenance Process to help you out.
  • As leaves fall from nearby trees, you’ll probably have to empty the debris net every day to keep up with the influx of leaves. Another option to prevent a buildup of leaves is to install some Pond Netting, which comes in several different sizes to fit your pond.
  • Have an Aerator on hand for the cold snaps that are sure to come. Aeration is very important during winter months, as aeration helps to keep a small hole open in the surface of the pond to aid in degassing.
  • Switch over to feeding your fish a cold water fish food, such as our Cold Water Fish Food. Their digestive systems are in the process of shutting down, so a food formulated for the colder temperatures will help them to make the transition.
  • Lastly, take some extra measures to ensure your aquatic plants make it through the winter months with a ThermoPlanter, available at The Pond Store.